Collectible Liberty Blue China

Staffordshire Liberty Blue, dinnerware tableware pattern was a 1976 promotional premium item made to tie in with the 1776-1976 bicentennial celebration of America´s Declaration of Independence from England. They were made by Enoch Wedgwood in the Staffordshire district of England, in the tradition of the 19th century Staffordshire historical blue china.

According to the Robbins Nest website, the china was “made by Enoch Wedgwood in the Staffordshire District of England in the tradition of the 19th century Staffordshire historical blue china”.

Photo by Arbor Antique Services

Photo by Arbor Antique Services

HISTORIC SCENES:

  • Washington crossing the Delaware
  • Lafayette landing at West Point
  • The Boston Tea Party
  • Paul Revere on horseback
  • Old North Church
  • Ben Franklin
  • Mt. Vernon – George Washington’s Home
  • Monticello – Thomas Jefferson’s Home
  • Independence Hall
  • Washington leaving Christ Church
  • Betsy Ross – the nation’s first flag

The Robbins Nest site also states that Liberty Blue china was originally designed as an incentive for Ben Franklin Savings and Loan customers. In October of 1976, Ben Franklin announced that the china would no longer be available. For the following five years, it was sold as a grocery store promotion. The china was very affordable with individual serving pieces selling for $.58 each.

According to Cindy Vee, Featured Education Contributor at Associated Content,

Authentic Liberty Blue pieces can be identified by a logo on the back featuring an eagle and flag and the wording “Liberty Blue, Original Copper Engravings of Historic Colonial Scenes, printed on Staffordshire Ironstone, Detergent and dishwasher safe, Made in England”. The logo also states the name of the historical scene depicted on the front of each piece.

Further information available at:  Robins Nest and Cindy Vee‘s article at Associated Content

BOOKS

I first learned of Liberty Blue from The Best of Collectible Dinnerware (Schiffer Book for Collectors). While there’s only a page or two on Liberty Blue, this book covers a ton of collectible dinnerware styles and patterns.

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